Julie Teaching 

MATS 321. INTRODUCTION TO MATERIALS SCIENCE

 

http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=MATS&coursenumber=321

 

Course Description

A junior level engineering class designed to introduce students to the basic structure-process-property relationships in materials science and engineering.

 

Textbook

Callister, Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 9th Ed., Wiley & Sons

 

Topics

  • Crystal structure
  • Microstructure
  • Physical properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and amorphous materials
  • Elementary mechanical behavior
  • Phase equilibria

 

Learning Objectives
By the completion of this course, students will be expected to:

 

  1. Predict basic physical properties of materials based on knowledge of their atomic composition and chemical bonding.
  2. Readily describe the structure of crystalline materials using the nomenclature of Bravais lattices and Miller Indices.
  3. Apply the principles of solid state diffusion to solve engineering problems to determine the effects of heating on composition profiles in solid solution materials in at least the 1-dimensional approximation.
  4. Use a binary phase diagram to quantitatively describe the compositions, phases and microstructures developed during heat treatments of binary solid systems.
  5. Use the principles of nucleation theory and solid state diffusion to solve problems involving kinetics of phase transformations in metal alloy systems

 

 

ME 499/599. SPECIAL TOPICS: WELDING METALLURGY

 

http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=ME&coursenumber=499

http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=ME&coursenumber=599

 

Course Description

Welding and joining skills are critical for the development of metal-based products. There is a growing industry need for engineers knowledgeable in joining technology. This theory-based class focused on the metallurgy of welds. You will learn about welding methods, heat input, diffusion, solidification, phase transformation and welding defects. This is NOT a laboratory welding class.

 

Textbook

Kou, Welding Metallurgy, 2th Ed., Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 0-471-43491-4

 

Topics

  • Welding Processes
  • Heat Flow
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Fluid Flow
  • Residual Stresses
  • Solidification
  • Phase Transformations
  • Segregation
  • Hot Cracking
  • Partially Melted Zone
  • Heat Affected Zone
  • Advanced Joining Techniques

 

Learning Outcomes

The student, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to:

 

  1. Know the pros and cons of joining techniques and be able to recommend suitable methods for various applications.
  2. Identify common welding defects to welding practices and offer mitigation strategies to eliminate the defects.
  3. Understand different solidification modes and constitutional supercooling.
  4. Use a binary phase diagram to quantitatively describe the compositions, phases and microstructures.

 

NE 599/ME 599. SPECIAL TOPICS: NUCLEAR MATERIALS

 

http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=NE&coursenumber=599

http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/CourseDetail.aspx?subjectcode=ME&coursenumber=599

 

Description

Introduction to the utilization of materials in nuclear reactor environments. Design issues in various nuclear reactor types and applications; radiation damage and effects; desirable design requirements and properties; fission reactor materials properties; fusion materials properties; radiation effects on fission reactor materials; radiation effects on fusion materials.

 

Textbook

Was, Gary S. (University of Michigan), Fundamentals of Radiation Materials Science, Metals and Alloys, Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2007

 

Topics

  • Nuclear reactor types and applications
  • General nuclear materials design requirements/properties
  • Radiation damage mechanisms
  • Effects of radiation damage

Learning Objectives

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of nuclear engineering materials in design applications.  By completion of the class students will be able to:

 

  1. Understand materials design issues in various reactor configurations.
  2. Recognize the materials used in different types of reactor applications.
  3. Recognize the predominant mechanisms for materials failure in radiation environments.
  4. Understand the fundamentals of radiation damage events.
  5. Understand the physical aspects of radiation damage phenomena including radiation induced swelling, irradiation hardening, fracture and embrittlement.