Biography

SALVADOR HERNANDEZ, Ph.D.  is an Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU). He earned his Ph.D. degree in Transportation Infrastructure Systems Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana in 2010. His current areas of research and expertise include the application of econometric and statistical methods to variety of engineering problems, supply chain and logistics modeling, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), and public and intermodal transportation. Prior to joining OSU he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) where he successfully completed projects in the area of freight transportation. 

Prior to UTEP, he was a research assistant at Purdue University’s NEXTRAN center a USDOT Region V Regional University Transportation Center, where he conducted research on the viability of freight carrier collaboration through the use of demand modeling instruments (survey and econometric techniques) and network analysis and optimization tools. In addition, he has significant expertise in data multivariate techniques, which were applied to an exploratory analysis for freight carrier collaboration project at NEXTRANS. He teaches transportation systems, transportation safety, and logistics related undergraduate and graduate courses.

Dr. Hernandez is a current member of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committees on:

 

Education 

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, 2010
Major Area: Transportation and Infrastructure Systems
Dissertation: “Modeling of Collaborative Less-Than-Truckload Carrier Freight Networks”
Supervisor: Dr. Srinivas Peeta

Brigham Young University, Provo, UT M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2003
Major Area: Transportation Engineering
Thesis: “Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Coordinated Ramp Meter Controls”
Supervisor: Dr. Mitsuru Saito

Brigham Young University, Provo, UT B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2001
Minor in Mathematics, December 2001